Archives tagged: tariffs

Top 6 – March 2018

By Tim J. Smith, PhD March 26, 2018

“U.S. stock markets ended their worst week in more than two years on Friday after China threatened to respond in kind to…

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Tariffs Defy Traditional Marketing and Pricing Thinking

By James T. Berger March 26, 2018

Not only will the American economy be hurt, these actions by an American President with very limited knowledge about economics, will affect the economies of many nations.

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Strategic Movements: April 2017

By Tim J. Smith, PhD April 12, 2017

What can sales managers do to reduce the risk of account loss? According to their research, putting top salespeople on the account doesn’t do the trick at all. Rather, putting a person familiar with the account’s industry on it, even if their past sales performance is average or even below average, can almost eliminate the risk of account loss.

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Pricing Done Right

By Tim J. Smith, PhD August 3, 2016

Pricing Done Right provides a roadmap for improving pricing practices within any market-oriented firm. It provides a framework for managing pricing decisions in any organization. It clarifies the best practices for defining the organizational culture, architectural hierarchy, and routines for getting pricing done right.

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Free Trade, Protectionism and Marketing

By James T. Berger May 9, 2016

Keeping less-productive Americans in their factory jobs means the U.S. government has to impose tariffs or quotas on the more efficiently produced foreign products. This will force the prices of those off shore goods to go up in order to match what it costs to produce them less efficiently in America. So the consumer has to pay, out of his/her own pocket, what it cost to keep a less productive American worker employed.

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Price Structure Improvements Drive UPS Earnings Up

By Tim J. Smith, PhD June 10, 2015

In terms of market segmentation alignment, different customers receive different benefits (perceived or real) from the same or similar product. This drives variation in willingness to pay. One goal in improving a price structure is to improve the match between the willingness to pay and the price extracted. It is a form of price segmentation.

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Play Ball!

By Curry W. Hilton August 11, 2011

Preventing the Resale of Sporting Event Tickets

StubHub, TicketNetwork, and eBay are marketplaces that allow customers to buy and sell unwanted tickets. For example, a season ticket holder uses StubHub as form of consignment to sell a Dallas Mavericks basketball ticket to a consumer that is available and willing to attend the game. The sellers of tickets in the secondary market are capitalizing on possessing elastic demand characteristics. But what about the team owners?

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AT&T and Verizon Mobile Data: A Product Category Maturing

By Tim J. Smith, PhD December 1, 2010

In the past six months, both AT&T (NYSE:T) and Verizon (NYSE:VZ) have altered their mobile data service price structures.  First, they added a metered fee based on the megabytes of traffic.  Now, Verizon is considering a price structure based on the speed of traffic provided.  With all these new forms of charges, some have feared customer backlash:  defection, brand betrayal, and a public relations nightmare.  Yet they needn’t worry much. Both these titans are in well traversed territory.

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Business Markets Game Changers
Reenergized Emerging Markets and Renewed Pricing Power

By Tim J. Smith, PhD May 3, 2010

The game in business markets has changed. The opportunity landscape has shifted from the stalwarts of North American and Europe to the onetime turbulent and unstable emerging markets. Furthermore, the pricing power that shrank to the ether is returning to the tangible as markets return to growth.

These are bold claims and require bold reengineering of corporate strategy. Before you the reader consider these to be audacious statements from an ill informed outsider on unimportant and irrelevant industries, let me provide the evidence.

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